Top 10

Year of the Survivor: Top 25 Films of 2013 + My Personal Awards

blue-is-the-warmest-color 1We’re all in the game to survive.

Film is often our societal mirror, an artistic outlet that serves as a sort of catharsis for those who make it as well as those who view it. Our own survival removes itself from the forefront of our momentary occupation in those dark hours spent in a movie theater. We transfer love, hope, and resilience to those onscreen.

The characters are us, and we are them.

We hope that they survive, and our happiness becomes theirs. There’s a powerful balance between reality and fiction, and that’s where the power of film lies.

2013 gave us a multitude of characters concerned with the art of preserving the current, restoring that which was lost, or pushing beyond their means to something greater than their life’s trajectory would have ever encompassed otherwise. 2013 was the year of the survivor.

12 Years a Slave, The Butler, and Fruitvale Station tell us of the will to survive in a society that deems you unworthy. At a time when the bigger war of racial equality has long since died, small battles of minority injustice wage across our nation. Black teenagers are shot for playing “thug” music too loud. Homosexuals are subjected to religiously-fueled hatred and ignorance, some of which has crept its way into potential laws in states like Arizona and Kansas. Survival is not the same for each of us. Normalcy is not universally objective.

2013’s films, however, put a face on so many minority issues.

12 Years a Slave, The Butler, and Fruitvale Station are not films merely directed by black men, rather they’re stories that connect to the American culture as told through black characters and black filmmakers. They’re not “white” stories directed by black men, nor are they “black” stories directed by white men, as we’re so used to seeing. There’s an authenticity here that works within and outside of Oscar season, that gives validity to the voice as it pours forth from the source of inequality in an industry where for every black man that directs a film, twenty white men are directing others.

The thing about 12 Years a Slave and Fruitvale Station is that they both are both based on actual events, yet bear cultural relevance to the society around them. 12 Years a Slave forces us to see slavery not as a black-and-white photo collection in a textbook, but as a tangible precursor to what we must deal with at a time where racial injustice is still a very real part of our culture (Fruitvale Station radiates a similar sentiment).

Survival for Dr. Ryan Stone in in Gravity takes the form of physical preservation and spiritual rebirth. In the film, we see a woman, lost in space, fighting for her physical existence while coming face to face with the spiritual turmoil brought on by the loss of her daughter years ago. By the film’s end, she is reborn both physically and emotionally after being violently cradled, in a sense, by her astronomical surroundings, ready to take on the world as a toddler taking its first steps when she finally reaches earth.

The Broken Circle Breakdown echoes the pains of loss and redemption that Gravity unearths, exploring the relationship between a man, woman, and their terminally ill daughter, all strung together by their affinity for music. The film forces its characters to weigh the importance of personal conviction versus love for another, powerfully pitting them against their desire to give their lover what they want, but failing to secure what they need. Feeling helpless, hopeless, and beyond repair is something we’re all familiar with, and The Broken Circle Breakdown makes the fragility of life and the burden of survival a beautiful disaster to see unfold.

Still, 2013 gave us films where characters succeed and prosper. Philomena, Short Term 12, and Stories We Tell weave intricate portraits of people broken down by their past and a failure to feel secure with “belonging” any place or with anyone, but who find strength through discovery of themselves through the eyes of others. The impact of one life on another is never more powerfully represented than it is in these films, and survival with peace of mind becomes essential to their subjects.

storieswetell13900x506Then, of course, we have the documentaries which hold a mirror to us as an audience. As we watch a daring filmmaker, Sarah Polley, unearth the secrets of her family’s history, we bathe in the fruits of her intensely personal labor that is Stories We Tell. With painstaking precision and care, Polley digs through her past to unearth a new reality for herself, one which essentially severed blood ties with the people she grew up with, as she discovers that the man who raised her is not biologically her father.

Blackfish taps into our innate desires to watch, to indulge in the visual, and to be entertained, but also brings us to question the basic human desire to conquer that which is bigger than us (in this case, SeaWorld’s enslavement of aquatic mammals). The Act of Killing examines the cruelty of humans unto each other, and how we can at once be so concerned with the preservation of security–as we define it for ourselves–that we let darkness consume our very being.

Chances are that these films will cement themselves in popular, critical, and scholarly culture for years to come. However, the most important films of 2013 are those which tap into film’s inherent nature as an art that discriminates against no one, as the power of storytelling is not specific to any one race, culture, or voice.

While 12 Years a Slave is an important film capping off a monumental year for black filmmakers in the industry, the importance of a film like Blue is thWarmest Color–by far the year’s best–cannot be ignored. While the LGBT faces discrimination around the world, the film is a welcome celebration of the highs, lows, ugly, and beautiful bits of unabashed love that knows only passion and sincerity, not gender.

It’s a film that doesn’t so much as challenge us, but invites us to indulge in its splendor, plunging us into the depths of the relationship between a young woman, Adele, on the road to maturation (Adele Exarchopoulos) and Emma (Lea Seydoux) an artist with a budding career.

We go along for the ride as Adele’s sexual and spiritual awakening unfolds. The film brilliantly frames her at once as a child–eating sloppily from plates her mother has prepared, bickering with classmates–and as a sexually-adventurous, fully-developed woman engaged in explicit sexual acts.

It’s a highly visual film with complex cinematography, riding on the strengths of the lushness of its stars, its images, and emotional affect. It isn’t afraid to be a film that you want to drink, to tempt you through feeling versus wordiness and intellect. It’s a film you must surrender yourself to, and fall into its warm (sometimes painful) embrace to experience the journey of its characters.

While the film contains explicit sexual content, its treatment at the hands of American audiences speaks volumes about things our culture needs to change. Prudish conservative mentalities will see only the sex and not the passion. They will see only the gender and not the love. They will see only the faults of the characters, and not the foolish, charming power of becoming lost in another person, unable to control our desires or pull ourselves out of the depths even as we drown.

Blue is the Warmest Color is, at once, an uninhibited portrayal of a type of love and attraction which transcends gender, though it is an important film for the increasing presence of the LGBT community in all aspects of life, and it must be regarded and defined by its pure representation of its characters’ relationship, as it’s a film that doesn’t insist upon defining itself by their gender.

An NC-17 rating (which it received in the United States) suggests that there’s something evil within its three-hour runtime, that there’s something unnaturally burdensome that the film carries and seeks to spread, but the only evil here is to let superficial factors (rating, lengthy runtime) dissuade you from enveloping yourself in the warm embrace of the finest film of the year.

Though Adele embarks on a journey to find clarity amidst a life of confusion, intense passion, regret, love lost, and emotional expenditure, the film cuts us loose from her without a clear resolution so much as reassurance that she’s grasped the experience of it all, which finally sees her becoming an adult by the film’s end. No more messy spaghetti curled around her lips. No more chewing with her mouth open. No more grappling with her insecurities as a child traversing the uneven terrain of maturity.

We gather that Adele, as she walks away from the frame after accepting that her lost lover has moved on, is on an uncertain path. Where she’s going is anyone’s guess, but we are certain that, unlike a stubborn child, she has learned something. But, most of all, she’s recognized and (somewhat) acquired the tools she needs to keep on surviving, even if a small part of her heart was lost in the battle.

Top 25 Best Films of 2013:
25 – 20 Feet From Stardom
24 – All Is Lost
23 – Spring Breakers
22 – Enough Said
21 – Captain Phillips
20 – Dallas Buyers Club
19 – Blackfish
18 – Fruitvale Station
17 – Prisoners
16 – The Place Beyond the Pines
15 – Frances Ha
14 – Stoker
13 – Blue Jasmine
12 – 12 Years a Slave
11 – The Hunt
10 – Stories We Tell
9 – Nebraska
8 – The Wolf of Wall Street
7 – The Act of Killing
6 – Her
5 – Inside Llewyn Davis
4 – Gravity
3 – Short Term 12
2 – The Broken Circle Breakdown
1 – Blue is the Warmest Color

gravity-alfonso-cuaron-george-clooney-set-imageBest Director:
1) Alfonso Cuaron – Gravity
2) Martin Scorsese – The Wolf of Wall Street
3) Sarah Polley – Stories We Tell
4) Joel & Ethan Coen – Inside Llewyn Davis
5) Felix Van Groeningen – The Broken Circle Breakdown
6) Harmony Korine – Spring Breakers

ht_leonardo_dicaprio_wolf_of_wall_street_ll_130617_wblogBest Actor:
1) Leonardo DiCaprio – The Wolf of Wall Street
2) Johan Heldenbergh – The Broken Circle Breakdown
3) Mads Mikkelsen – The Hunt
4) Matthew McConaughey – Dallas Buyers Club
5) Oscar Isaac – Inside Llewyn Davis
6) Hugh Jackman – Prisoners

cate_blanchett_blue_jasmine bannerBest Actress:
1) Cate Blanchett – Blue Jasmine
2) Adele Exarchopoulos – Blue is the Warmest Color
3) Veerle Baetens – The Broken Circle Breakdown
4) Meryl Streep – August: Osage County
5) Julia Louis Dreyfus – Enough Said
6) Lauren Ambrose – About Sunny

Screen-Shot-2013-07-16-at-12.32.57-AM-600x369Best Supporting Actor:
1) Michael Fassbender – 12 Years a Slave
2) Jared Leto – Dallas Buyers Club
3) Keith Stanfield – Short Term 12
4) Casey Affleck – Ain’t Them Bodies Saints
5) Bruce Dern – Nebraska
6) Jonah Hill – The Wolf of Wall Street

Still-5Best Supporting Actress:
1) Lea Seydoux – Blue is the Warmest Color
2) Julia Roberts – August: Osage County
3) Lupita Nyong’o – 12 Years a Slave
4) Kristin Scott Thomas – Only God Forgives
5) Oprah Winfrey – Lee Daniels’ The Butler
6) Scarlett Johansson – Don Jon

HERBest Screenplay:
1)
Her
2) The Wolf of Wall Street
3) Inside Llewyn Davis
4) Frances Ha
5) Blue Jasmine
6) Nebraska

gravity1Best Cinematography:
1) Gravity
2) Stoker
3) Blue is the Warmest Color
4) Inside Llewyn Davis
5) To the Wonder
6) The Grandmaster
7) Upstream Color

The-Wolf-of-Wall-Street-Trailer7aBest Film Editing:
1) The Wolf of Wall Street
2) 12 Years a Slave
3) Inside Llewyn Davis
4) Stoker
5) All Is Lost
6) Gravity

blue-is-the-warmest-color-movieBest Foreign Film:
1) Blue is the Warmest Color
2) The Broken Circle Breakdown
3) The Act of Killing
4) The Hunt
5) The Grandmaster
6) Bastards

343330995_640Best Documentary Feature:
1) The Act of Killing
2) Stories We Tell
3) Blackfish
4) 20 Feet From Stardom

GravitySpaceStationExplodeShottsr4Best Visual Effects:
1)
Gravity
2) Pacific Rim
3) The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
4) Man of Steel
5) This Is The End

rs_560x415-130824183357-1024.Grandmaster6.mh.082413Best Costume Design:
1) The Grandmaster
2) The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
3) 12 Years a Slave
4) Her
5) American Hustle

pic_article_story_mainBest Production Design:
1) The Grandmaster
2) Gravity
3) The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
4) Her
5) The Great Gatsby
6) Pacific Rim

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Top 10 of 2012 So Far: Part 1 of 2 (10-6)

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It’s rolling around again; that time of year I’m forced to see Oscar-baity emotional low-blows by myself at the local art theater, weakness tissues in-hand, ready to cry my little heart out as strangers stare in judgment; the time of year that makes cinephiles, fashionistas, and Meryl Streep wet with anticipation. Although the latter has nothing to really look forward to this Oscar season (sorry, Hope Springs, no Academy “due wins” coming your way this year), it’s a joyous time to celebrate nonetheless. With major film festivals winding down (Cannes, Telluride) and a few others yet to come (Toronto), 2012 has thus far spoon-fed us heapings of potential. Already, offerings from Ridley Scott, Christopher Nolan and Woody Allen earlier served only to wet our appetites for what the next few auteur-saturated months have in store. We’ll see films from the likes of Haneke, Tarantino, Spielberg (sit down, haters), and Bigelow (I’m still pissed about 2009, though), all before the year’s end. But the real surprises have come in the form of the art film, as beautiful pieces like Damsels in Distress, Magic Mike, Beasts of the Southern Wild and Celeste & Jesse Forever have already made their marks on the hearts of millions.

It’s still too early to pinpoint frontrunners in any major categories and this list will undoubtedly change in a month’s time, but let’s take a look back at what, in my opinion, stands out from the rest of 2012’s early releases.

My Top 10 of 2012 So Far: Part 1 of 2 (#s 10-6)

Close Call: #11Damsels in Distress (Whit Stillman)

To challenge the very notion of what a film “is” or “should be;” that, I believe, is the intent of writer/director Whit Stillman with his latest, “Damsels in Distress.” Stillman exacts his revenge on conditioned filmgoers as a Dada mastermind, using actresses and a self-aware pretentious vocabulary in place of recontexualized urinals and hat racks. We’re plopped smack dab in the center of a prestigious east coast university, following the trials and tribulations of its most elite (at least they think so) group of well-to-do girls, headed by the self-important-but-with-a-tinge-of-pitying-empathy Violet (Greta Gerwig), who takes it upon herself to bestow the gift of social relevancy upon new student Lily (Analeigh Tipton, of “America’s Next Top Model” fame). We see the gaggle of girls interact with other students, flirt with boys, juggle relationships, and ultimately forcibly insert themselves into a young peoples’ generation that’s forgotten the value of pomp and circumstance, although the girls aren’t free from various social trappings themselves. Violet is self-destructive, like June Cleaver and The Joker birthed a baby with a time bomb inside, hoping to correct in college society what she fears about herself. The “plot” doesn’t evolve much beyond that, the film mainly functioning as a showcase for Stillman’s (often ironic) construction of verbal exchanges that function more as exertions of existential musings than actual conversations. The results are often hilarious only because we, as an audience, are fully capable of recognizing the ludicrous outlook of the group, which involves giving away a free box of donuts at a self-help and suicide group meeting; perhaps the other students don’t care, or maybe their blind-eyed aloofness to the hilarity going on around them is what makes Stillman’s mirror to youth so infectiously amusing.

#10Safety Not Guaranteed (Colin Trevorrow)

Whether it’s global politics or a simple conversation with your neighbor about how they were able to afford their new car, skepticism runs rampant everywhere you look. “Safety Not Guaranteed,” earlier this year a Sundance hit, forces the audience into a skeptic’s nightmare  as we follow pessimist Darius (Aubrey Plaza) as she investigates a local man for a magazine article. This is no ordinary man, mind you; he’s got a reputation as the local whackjob, claiming he can travel back in time. He seeks a partner to do help him, places an ad in a newspaper, and Darius responds. She’s had a rough life of her own, losing her mother at a young age, fumbling internships and asshole bosses, and a stagnant love life; all the trappings our increasingly glum outlook on life as young adults has afforded us. We’re set up for failure, and our attitudes certainly reflect that. However, the big question that looms over the audience’s head (can he really do it?) becomes more satisfying as the film progresses, giving us (and Darius) something to actually look forward to, a blinding light on the other side of the everyday murk and grime. The film successfully builds a sweetly subdued (thanks in part to Plaza’s wonderfully placid demeanor) romantic relationship between the non-believer and the champion. The payoff isn’t quite as satisfying as I would have hoped, ending a bit too abruptly, but the film is charming nonetheless, with characters and relationships standing in for the audience’s growing affections for the alluring fantasy of the impossible.

#9 – To Rome, With Love (Woody Allen)

If it’s a love letter he wants to write, it’s a love letter I will accept. Woody Allen’s latest euro-indulgence comes in the form of the aptly-titled “To Rome, With Love,” a fairly seductive portrait of a city he’s very much in love with, albeit characters that are often forgotten in the wake of his affections. Allen’s one-a-year film philosophy fails more often than not (the success of last year’s “Midnight in Paris” likely won’t be repeated), but there’s always something of value to be gleaned from even the most lukewarm of exercises. Here, we’re given the standard Allen treatment; numerous vignettes unfold, the most satisfying of which involving an aging, pessimistic, neurotic American opera director musing on life and death (and the apprehensions that come with both) amidst his daughter’s budding engagement to an Italian man. Other characters include an average Italian Joe (Roberto Benigni) who wakes up one day only to find that he’s literally become an overnight superstar, and a middle-aged American architect (Alec Baldwin) revisiting his past experiences of love and loss in Rome. The locales are beautifully shot, with Darius Khondji’s gorgeous cinematography lapping up the beauty of Rome more effectively than Allen’s writing captures the spirit of his subjects. It can’t be denied, however, that the earnest intent of Allen’s latest is altogether charming, begging us to indulge in a ninety-minute cinematic vacation with one of the most prolific auteurs in history.

#8The Cabin in the Woods (Drew Goddard)

“The Cabin in the Woods,” simply put, is a film buff’s wet dream. If the words self-reflexivity, the male excessively campy assault on the decades of research by film scholars like Carol Clover and Laura Mulvey, who dissected horror films, in short, as exploitations of the female entity for the sexually insatiable gaze of the male spectator. The film systematically deconstructs all notions even casual moviegoers have regarding the horror genre; if you go to X place, Y monster will kill you. If you fit X personality or racial profile, you’ll die in Y order. “The Cabin in the Woods” functions as a satisfyingly critical (and altogether hilarious) vision of the horror genre, playing on elements we know and expect from horror films but recontextualizing them to mean something much greater about the social, sexual, corporate, and ethical norms that most often find their outlets in a medium that’s meant to be pure entertainment; film.

#7Prometheus (Ridley Scott)

This mid-year delight’s greatness comes as no surprise, as anything Ridley Scott touches generally turns to gold (Robin Hood and G.I. Jane, you’re obviously not invited to this party). Prometheus sees the 74-year old mastermind behind Alien and Blade Runner return to his sci-fi roots after a string of lukewarm dramatic releases during the latter half of the 2000s, proving that while his edge as a maestro of “shock” has worn dull, the visionary’s flair for grandiose fantasy has only sharpened with age. The film (is it an Alien prequel or not?) functions as part space-opera thriller, part existential babbler. While the ideas posed by characters in search of the race of superbeings that supposedly created humans stimulate our curiosity and probe the deepest corners of our miniscule human brains, the film finds its footing as it couples such existential ennui with an intense pulse bursting classic sci-fi action. Prometheus’ scope is far too encompassing for one film, so let’s hope the planned sequel(s) allow this would-be series to forge a path of its own amidst the constant onslaught of contemporary space-horror dreck.

#6The Hunger Games (Gary Ross)

The line between pop culture trash and legitimate art is growing increasingly thick, what with reality shows, media sensationalizing, and a growing audience’s insatiable desire for subjects that bear only superficial traces of originating from the human race. While “Jersey Shore” and “Keeping Up With The Kardashians” are contributing to the intellect-ocalypse, Suzanne Collins managed to channel inspiration from such programs into a powerful comment on our society’s willingness to abandon our own reality and indulge in a fabricated one, with her “Hunger Games” book series chronicling the fictional nation of Panem as it hosts an annual competition which pits children against each other in a televised fight to the death. The novels are refreshing and cleverly written, with Collins crafting a powerful parable for our times that criticizes at once the rift between bourgeois sense of entitlement and daily lower class struggles, and further the prevalence of “reality”-based media and its damaging consequences for our society. A film based on a written critique of visual arts sounds like a no-brainer; alas, it’s of utmost importance to judge an adaptation and its source material as two separate texts, and thankfully Gary Ross’ The Hunger Games makes a substantial claim as a fantastic film in its own right. As we’ve seen with the Twilight film series, an adaptation can be mere cut-and-paste moving images merely lifted from a young adult novel, but Ross’ film takes full advantage of the cinematic medium to craft an uber-coherent (surprisingly) film that takes inspiration from Collins’ series and rebirths it into something fresh and tangible for the big screen. Lush cinematography, symbolic juxtapositions, and meaty socio-political commentary make The Hunger Games the first film in a (as of this publication) four-part series that was entirely dependent on its freshman release to build credibility as more than just a teeny-bopper distraction.

Part 2 (#s 5-1) coming soon!

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2010 Thus Far; Top 10 Films, Pretentious Students, and Shameless Hating on Kathryn Bigelow

In case you haven’t noticed (holla at my 2 faithful readers out there!) I’ve been severely slacking on my blog game as of late. Starting my film classes at Pitt this semester has really taken a toll on my love for film, and I can confidently say I’ve never felt more defeated in my life. You know, film classes really destroy the medium. At least that’s how I feel right now. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve encountered some fabulous instructors who give a great deal of insight into the topics their teaching (shoutout to Neepa!) and really give a new perspective on tired elements of the industry, but I feel like constantly (and consistently) analyzing the shit out of individual works of art totally strips any and all mystique away from these personalized products. I’m surrounded by (and being swallowed alive by) the pretentious arthouse crowd I’ve come to know as peers (aka fellow film students) who pretend to be completely unaware of the vast amount of made-up-but-intellectual-sounding bullshit that’s coming out of their mouths as if they’ve accidentally talked themselves into a goldmine of analytical pretention concerning the film under discussion. I mean yeah, I can make Esper’s The Maniac sound like a critique on 1930s censorship masked as brilliant piece of intentionally-bad filmmaking by using big words, too, but I’m going to take it for what it is; a really shitty, half-assed waste of time to sit through.

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But, I’m getting way off-topic here…why did I start writing this piece again, you may ask? That’s right, to inform all six of you reading this (the only two that count are the aforementioned faithful readers, not including my grandfather and parents…and yes I’m including the second read my grandfather will probably give this in my count) of my annual pre-Oscar season top 10 of the year so far. And what better time to do this than that point during the year just before I become inundated (and slightly incapacitated) by brilliant performances and emotional low-blows whilst crying by myself at the local arthouse theater…why yes, Oscar Season is nearly upon us! (note: I wish I had more friends willing to accompany me to these things, but the thought of sitting through two hours of foreign films or things that don’t involve fake shaky cam ghosts doesn’t exactly entice the majority of my circle of friends).
So far this year, we’ve quite honestly seen some of the most interesting year-to-date release patterns I can recall of the past decade. I mean hell, Shutter Island went from being last year’s top contender in a handful of major categories to a *possible* technical filler nominee simply by pushing its release date to the first quarter of this year. We also watched The Kids Are All Right single-handedly do nothing to cement itself as a pre-beginning-race shoe-in for Best Picture, the only true lock on the radar at this point in any category. Baffling, I know…and not because of the quality of the film, but once again because of the release date. Summer releases generally don’t garner the acclaim needed to sustain a successful awards run, but Kids has come out of nowhere (thanks in large part to its progressive message’s relevance to society’s shift in ideology concerning sexuality) but will undoubtedly end up somewhere truly substantial. I really see this film maintaining its awards season steam well beyond its time, something modern BP winners rarely succeed in doing (Hurt Locker wha? Million Dollar Baby wai?). Pluse, I mean, you can’t deny that my love for the film has anything to do with the presence of goddess Julianne Moore (who some of you will remember I’ve included in my made-while-drunk list of “Best People in the Whole World”…yes, no other qualifiers necessary other than simply being “Best” to me while intoxicated) who gives her usual effervescent (I believe I misspelled that word, but I’m leaving it like that because it amuses me) performance as a lovely lezzy (melts my heart every time). I fear that the Academy will shy away from Moore in favor of Bening, though, simply based on marketing placing Bening at the forefront of the film’s cast. Ugh. Screw lead roles, I’m all for the ANTM-alum (miss Yaya DaCosta, holla Cycle 3!) getting some major screentime in the film. Score one for Tyra.
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The majority of quality releases for 2010 thus far have undeniably come from veteran directors engaging in the usual arthouse/independent stint; Rodrigo Garcia stuck true to his reflective I-wish-I-were-a-woman ways with the fabulously, dishearteningly bleak Mother and Child (can you sense that I get immense pleasure out of acknowledging that I like feeling such emotional turmoil whilst watching a film?) of which contains one of the best performances of the entire year from Naomi Watts; Mark Romanek treated us to another dazzlingly depressing (albeit thematically irrelevant, even though it thinks it isn’t) film with Never Let Me Go; and Debra Granik also returns (after a 6 year hiatus from 2004’s epic Down to the Bone) with the taut and sufficiently rattling Winter’s Bone, a film (and director, I might add) that recalls the female-empowerment (deservedly so, as was not the case with Kathryn Bigelow) trip (both narratively and in terms of the awards circuit) of Frozen River’s Courtney Hunt two years ago.
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But 2010’s stand-out gem is none other than Luca Guadagnino’s brutal portrait of domestic feminine sacrifice I Am Love. Guadagnino directs Tilda Swinton in one of the most haunting and relevant narratives to grace American screens since Rachel Getting Married. Swinton gives one of the best performances of her career (as she usually tends to do in these under-the-radar arthouse pictures) thanks to her unflinching willingness to delve into territory many other actresses of her iconic status would dare tread.
But what to look forward to? What’s in store for us this upcoming Oscar Season? Well, my darlings, that’s an entirely different post that I’m not all that inclined to spend an hour crafting right now. For the time being, let’s just marvel at what we’ve been graced with thus far into the year, and giddily anticipate the vast amounts of cinematic fabulosity (holla Kimora) we know is coming our way over the next few months *cough* Black. Freaking. Swan *cough*. Cheers to 2010 so far. I mean, what could possibly go wrong? The only direction a year following one in which this happened…
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…can only be up, right? Here’s hoping…

Oh and PS, no, I haven’t grown tired of quoting the Meryl Streep version of Julia Child at ear-splitting levels at amusingly-inappropriate times…oh how 2009 will live on in mysterious ways.

Top 10 of 2010 (So Far)

1 – I Am Love

2 – The Kids Are All Right

3 – Catfish

4 – Mother and Child

5 – Never Let Me Go

6 – I’m Still Here

7 – Conviction

8 – Shutter Island

9 – Chloe

10 – Winter’s Bone